Leaders Curate Ideas

You don’t make a great museum by putting all the art in the world into a single room.

That’s a warehouse.

What makes a museum great is the stuff that’s not on the walls. Someone says no. A curator is involved, making conscious decisions about what should stay and what should go. There’s an editing process. There’s a lot more stuff off the walls than on the walls. The best is a sub-sub-subset of all the possibilities.

It’s the stuff you leave out that matters.

So constantly look for things to remove, simplify, and streamline. Be a curator. Stick to what’s truly essential. Pare things down until you’re left with only the most important stuff. Then do it again. You can always add stuff back in later if you need to.

The inspirational words above come from the book Rework by Jason Fried and David Heinemeier Hansson, the founders of 37signals. If you don’t own it, you should.

The artwork below is by illustrator Mike Rohde.

Be a curator

Both are important to me, as they represent the role I began at Auxano four years ago today – the Vision Room Curator.

My role has expanded in many ways since 2012 – but at the heart of everything I do is the concept of curation. But I don’t curate things – I curate ideas, represented in the image above by the light bulbs. There’s a lot of ideas floating around in the world today – but only a few need to be turned on.

Being a curator may be my vocational role, but it’s also something every leader needs to practice.

What will you curate today?

 

 

 

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New Beginnings

Today I begin a new chapter in my life – as Curator of the Vision Room at Auxano.

Yeah.

No – YEAH!

To find out the scoop, take a look at the tabs above for full information.

For a trip back to the day it started, I’ve reprinted a post from November 10, 2008: reflections on the day I first met Will Mancini.

School’s Out – on Strategic Planning

As I’ve posted many times on this blog, Catalyst 2008 totally rocked my boat on a personal and business level – to the point of tipping it over! I’m still processing and talking about Catalyst, and probably will be till next year’s Catalyst (yeah – I’ve already registered for it, along with the rest of my family – but that’s another post).

My boat just turned over again.

Will Mancini, author of Church Unique and founder and Clarity Evangelist at Auxano, was kind enough to meet with me and the editor of Church Solutions magazine, Karen Butler, on the last day of WFX in Houston last week. Will was joined by Cheryl Marting, Chief Connections Officer at Auxano (already they win the award for coolest job titles). Since Will lives in Houston, the original intent was just to get to know him a little better in advance of next February’s Church Solutions Conference and Expo. Karen set the lunch up, and was very kind to include me in. As soon as the conversation started, it was obvious to me that God had set this up all along to continue the “mind expansion” He set in place at Catalyst.

Church Unique was published earlier this year by Leadership Network. I’m a huge fan of Leadership Network – I attended a Leadership Gathering in 1995 and have participated in several national training events since then (thank you Sue Mallory for all you have done for equipping ministries in the church). Anyway, when LN publishes a book, I’m all over it. So when Church Unique came out, I picked it up – and it mesmerized me from the opening pages.

My experience with strategic planning matters goes back to seminary in the early 80’s: Lyle Schaller, Aubrey Malphurs, Bobb Biehl, Kennon Callahan, Peter Drucker – these were the leaders in the field that we followed. Others have joined them in the years since, but all of these – and especially Malphurs – have influenced my own views of strategic planning in the churches I served and in the churches I work with now as a development consultant.

I had not gotten further than the introduction of Church Unique and a table contrasting strategic planning and Mancini’s Vision Pathway than I knew my views of strategic planning and its place in the church world had changed – forever.

His approach centers on the powerfully simple concept that God has created all churches as unique. While we understand that God created His world with uniqueness (think snowflakes), and His children (DNA, environment, and culture) the same way, we think that churches are mostly alike.

Do you think He would act any differently with His church?

Over the next few days, I will be posting a few of the nuggets of Church Unique. But don’t take my word for it – get a copy immediately, block out some time to dive into it, and prepare to put on a life-preserver – your boat is going to be rocked!

Here are those posts if you are interested:

Over the past four years I’ve written dozens of posts about Will, Auxano, and Church Unique.

Now I get to live it out!

That’s a God thing…